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Nathan B. Wardner

Nathan B. Wardner

Male 1820 - 1894  (73 years)

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  • Name Nathan B. Wardner 
    Born 12 Apr 1820  Wheatland, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 6 Apr 1894  Milton Junction, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Milton Junction Cemetery, Milton Junction, Rock County, Wisconsin, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I15695  Family Tree
    Last Modified 10 Nov 2013 

    Father Philip Wardner,   b. 16 Apr 1777, Alstead, New Hampshire, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jul 1852, Andover, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Mother Mary Wise,   b. 25 May 1783, Westminster, Vermont, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Aug 1822  (Age 39 years) 
    Married 27 Jan 1803  Grafton, Vermont, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F15116  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Olive Brown Forbes,   b. 22 May 1822, Locke, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Oct 1888, Milton Junction, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years) 
    Children 
    +1. Morton Smith Wardner,   b. 14 Jan 1850, Shanghai, China Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Dec 1943, Chicago, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 93 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F15219  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Martha S. Harvey,   b. 6 May 1856, Milton Junction, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Dec 1925, Battle Creek, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years) 
    Married Dec 1889 
    Last Modified 10 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F15220  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 12 Apr 1820 - Wheatland, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 6 Apr 1894 - Milton Junction, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Milton Junction Cemetery, Milton Junction, Rock County, Wisconsin, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Nathan Wardner
    Nathan Wardner

    Census
    1860 US Census
    1860 US Census
    Alfred, Allegany County, New York
    1870 US Census
    1870 US Census
    Akron, Perioa County, Illinois
    1880 US Census
    1880 US Census
    West Milton, Rock County, Wisconsin
    1820 US Census
    1820 US Census
    Caledonia, Genesee County, New York
    1830 US Census
    1830 US Census
    Andover, Allegany County, New York

  • Notes 
    • Nathan Wardner was born in Wheatland, Monroe Co., N. Y., April 6, 1820, and died at Milton Junction, Wis., April 6, 1894. His father, Phillip Wardner, was a Baptist deacon, and his mother an earnest Christian worker, zealous in the cause of missions, who dying when he was about two and a half years of age, consecrated him, it is supposed, in his infancy to the gospel ministry and especially to missionary work among the heathen.
      When he was about five years of age his father with his family moved to Andover, Allegany Co., N. Y., where the limited resources of the family and the toil and struggle, incident to a comparatively new and undeveloped section of the country, rendered his early life, as a farmer boy, one of busy, yet healthful toil, and one affording very little opportunity for attaining the education which it was his early ambition to acquire.
      The influence of a well ordered Christian home early laid the foundation of an upright, truth-loving and morally steadfast life. In the spring of 1839 he became the subject of saving grace and in the following June was baptized into the Baptist Church of Andover, N. Y. After his conversion and baptism came the conviction of duty to preach the gospel and with it the increased sense of his need of education as a preparation for a work of so much importance and responsibility. In the way of effort for the attainment of the needed culture he spent the winters of 1839 and '40, 1840 and '41 in study at Alfred Academy. After the summer of 1841, having attained his majority, with an occasional term out, to earn the means to meet his expenses, he continued his studies at Alfred until 1846.
      At Alfred he commenced the investigation of the Sabbath question in the confident expectation that he should find abundant Bible authority for Sunday-keeping and having little, if any, thought of the possibility that he would himself be led to accept, instead of the Sunday, God's sanctified seventh-day Sabbath. The struggle through which he passed was that of the devoutly, loyal Christian man, honestly endeavoring to lay the foundations of a Christian life upon the sure word of God. It ended when at last he surrendered himself of the divine will and authority and conscientiously committed himself to God in the keeping of his holy day. This change of sentiment and corresponding change in his practice of Sabbath-keeping occurred about the middle of January, 1843. About two months later, March 18, 1843, he united with the First Alfred Church. The joy of this second and more complete giving of himself to God, he himself describes as 'exceeding even the ardor of his first love,' and as 'rewarding him a thousand fold for all the sacrifices he had made.'
      In September, 1846, he accepted the call of the Seventh-day Baptist Missionary Society to become a missionary on the foreign field. On the 6th day of the following month of October, at a missionary meeting held with the first church of Alfred, he was united in marriage with Miss Olive Brown Forbes, who was also a convert to the Sabbath, and both willing and ready to share with him the self-denial, cares, labors and responsibilities incident to missionary labor on a foreign field.
      At Plainfield, N. J., Dec. 31, 1846, he was ordained to the work of the gospel ministry. At the same time himself and wife, Solomon Carpenter and wife were, by prayerful consecration, set apart to the China Mission. Five days later, Jan. 5, 1847, this company of Seventh-day Baptist missionaries set sail from New York harbor for their future field of labor. In the autumn of 1857 Missionary Wardner returned to his native land expecting to go back to the China field within a few months at the longest. From this he was deterred by the condition of Mrs. Wardner's health, who had been in this country for a year or more, seeking the restoration of impaired health and strength, but was not sufficiently restored to go back and take up again the duties of the missionary on the China field.
      Since his return to this country Mr. Wardner has spent most of his life in meeting the active and responsible duties of the pastor, and has served with efficiency and acceptance the following churches: Second Alfred, N. Y., 1858-1866; Pawcatuck, R. I., 1866 to 1868; West Hallock, Ill., 1868 to 1875. From 1875 to 1877 he was in the employ of the American Sabbath Tract Society as Sabbath Reform missionary to Great Britain with his headquarters at Edinburg, Scotland. The Haarlem, Holland, Seventh-day Baptist Church and Mission came into existence through the publication and distribution of Sabbath Reform literature at Edinburg by Missionary Wardner. In 1877 he again became pastor, settling with the church at Milton Junction, Wis., in which relation he continued until 1890. From 1890 to 1982 he was busy with certain lines of literary work and frequent preaching. From 1892 until the time of his death he was the pastor of the church at Utica, Wis., thus being permitted, with a good degree of mental and physical vigor, to work up to the margin of an active and useful life.
      The companion of his early life and toil in the Master's vineyard, Olive Forbes Wardner, died at Milton Junction, Oct. 5, 1888. There were born unto them two sons, one of whom died in childhood, the other, Dr. M. S. Wardner, is now a practicing physician at Garwin, Iowa. Dec. 4, 1889, he was married to Miss Mattie Harvey, a worthy and devout Christian, who, after a brief and happy married life, is left to mourn him, whose loving ministry in sickness and suffering had brought to her the fuller appreciation of the loss sustained by his death.
      He was conscientious and steadfast in his devotion to truth and duty, upright in life and character, incisive and logical in his methods of thought and discourse, and leaves behind him the influence and benediction of a life sincerely earnest in its purpose and effort to walk with God and lead his fellowmen to the knowledge of that truth which makes men wise unto salvation.

      "The Sabbath Recorder", Vol 50, No 16, p 243, Apr. 19, 1894.
      and "The Seventh Day Baptist Yearbook", 1894, p 45.